Wave Force Response of Bridge Superstructures

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General Information
Solicitation Number: 1172
Status: Solicitation withdrawn
Date Posted: Oct 10, 2007
Last Updated: Nov 02, 2007
Solicitation Expires: Dec 31, 2007
Partners: TX
Lead Organization: Federal Highway Administration
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2008
Commitment End Year: 2010
100% SP&R Approval: Pending Approval
Commitments Required: $210,000.00
Commitments Received: $30,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Gary Jensen
Gary.Jensen@dot.gov
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Kornel Kerenyi
kornel.kerenyi@dot.gov
Phone: 202-493-3142
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Texas Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Dacio Marin Frank Bailey 512- 416-4730 rtimain@txdot.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2009 $15,000.00 Dacio Marin Frank Bailey 512- 416-4730 rtimain@txdot.gov

Background

Bridges constructed over water bodies with large fetch lengths are potentially subject to large amplitude waves and therefore wave loading. Wave loads on horizontal structures, such as bridge superstructures, have not received much attention by the research community until recently. The failure of several major bridges due to storm surge and waves during Hurricanes Ivan and Katrina has brought this issue to light. A pilot study to examine bridges in a coastal region of Florida for vulnerability to storm surge and wave loads was recently conducted. The results of this investigation indicates that there may be a number of bridges on the US East and Gulf Coasts that are susceptible to these types of loads during design storm conditions. Most of the work to date and in progress on wave forces on bridge superstructures is directed at establishing better methods for predicting wave loads and designing retrofits for existing bridges. This research proposal addresses the response of bridge superstructures subjected to waves. Wave forces on these structures are complex with many components including drag, inertia, buoyancy change in added mass, etc. By conducting wave tank tests with bridge decks that are allowed to move when subjected to waves and accurately recording the motion the problem can be approached from a different angle. That is, if you know the response, the forces and moments required to produce that motion can then be computed. This will provide information regarding added mass, change in added mass. These forces on the structure are not obtainable by other methods. The results of this study will also be helpful in the development of retrofits for existing bridges, the design of new bridges as well as information needed to test and modify existing wave load predictive methods and equations. Once the wave force equations have been validated they can be used to test storm surge and wave models at damaged bridge sites where span displacements have been measured. In summary, the results of this study will improve the methods and equations for predicting storm surge and wave loads on bridge superstructures.

Objectives

The objective of this proposed research is to obtain bridge superstructure response to wave loading. This information will be most useful in the development of bridge retrofits and to test and improve wave load predictive methods and equations. The proposed study will also help to validate hurricane wave and storm surge models

FHWA Hydraulics R&D is currently conducting preliminary small scale wave deck response tests at the TFHRC Hydraulics Laboratory. The wave tank at TFHRC has several limitations because of the small scale.

The proposed study has to be conducted in a larger wave tank to validate and to augment tests performed at the TFHRC Hydraulics Lab. The planned study will include wave tank tests with model bridge spans, the reduction and analysis of the data and the extraction of the forces and moments required to produce the observed motion. The resulting forces and moments will then be used to test and improve existing storm surge and wave force predictive methods and equations.

Scope of Work

The scope of work consists of researching wave deck response forces, especially to determine added mass and change in added mass effects. The deck response forces will be determined by measuring deck response displacements and response accelerations.

The project will consist of the following tasks:

Task 1. Assemble a technical advisory committee that will provide oversight and guidance on all aspects of the project.

Task 2. Conduct a literature search and compile and review the pertinent technical papers and reports on this subject. Coordinate with the TFHRC Hydraulics researchers team the design of the experimental set-up.

Task 3. Construct and instrument model bridge spans. Install models in the wave tank and test/calibrate the instrumentation.

Task 4 Perform wave loading tests and measure the span response with high speed cameras and accelerometers. Tests will be conducted for a wide range of wave parameters (i.e. wave height and period). Collaborate with TFHRC Hydraulics researcher¿s team capturing bridge span response using motion tracking imagery.

Task 5. Reduce and analyze the data from the tests.

Task 6. Knowing the structure parameters (mass density, dimensions, center of mass, etc.) and the response compute the forces and moments required to produce the observed responses. Compare the force results with those produced by existing wave force predictive equations. Modify the existing equations to obtain improved predictive equations. Validate hurricane wave and storm surge modeling with scaled movements observed in the field.

Task 7. Prepare a report to document the study approach and results. The report will include improved wave load predictive methods and equations. It will also suggest bridge retrofits that will reduce bridge deck movements.

Comments

$15,000/year

The Federal Highway Administration will serve as the coordinator for this pooled-fund project. State DOT¿s will be solicited for their interest and participation in this study. Periodic reviews will be arranged to keep participating states and agencies up-to-date on current developments. These reviews may include meetings in Washington D. C. during the annual TRB Session, e-mail submittals and conference calls.

No document attached.

Wave Force Response of Bridge Superstructures

General Information
Solicitation Number: 1172
Status: Solicitation withdrawn
Date Posted: Oct 10, 2007
Last Updated: Nov 02, 2007
Solicitation Expires: Dec 31, 2007
Partners: TX
Lead Organization: Federal Highway Administration
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2008
Commitment End Year: 2010
100% SP&R Approval: Pending Approval
Commitments Required: $210,000.00
Commitments Received: $30,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Gary Jensen
Gary.Jensen@dot.gov
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Kornel Kerenyi
kornel.kerenyi@dot.gov
Phone: 202-493-3142
Commitments by Organizations
Agency Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Texas Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Dacio Marin Frank Bailey 512- 416-4730 rtimain@txdot.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2009 $15,000.00 Dacio Marin Frank Bailey 512- 416-4730 rtimain@txdot.gov

Background

Bridges constructed over water bodies with large fetch lengths are potentially subject to large amplitude waves and therefore wave loading. Wave loads on horizontal structures, such as bridge superstructures, have not received much attention by the research community until recently. The failure of several major bridges due to storm surge and waves during Hurricanes Ivan and Katrina has brought this issue to light. A pilot study to examine bridges in a coastal region of Florida for vulnerability to storm surge and wave loads was recently conducted. The results of this investigation indicates that there may be a number of bridges on the US East and Gulf Coasts that are susceptible to these types of loads during design storm conditions. Most of the work to date and in progress on wave forces on bridge superstructures is directed at establishing better methods for predicting wave loads and designing retrofits for existing bridges. This research proposal addresses the response of bridge superstructures subjected to waves. Wave forces on these structures are complex with many components including drag, inertia, buoyancy change in added mass, etc. By conducting wave tank tests with bridge decks that are allowed to move when subjected to waves and accurately recording the motion the problem can be approached from a different angle. That is, if you know the response, the forces and moments required to produce that motion can then be computed. This will provide information regarding added mass, change in added mass. These forces on the structure are not obtainable by other methods. The results of this study will also be helpful in the development of retrofits for existing bridges, the design of new bridges as well as information needed to test and modify existing wave load predictive methods and equations. Once the wave force equations have been validated they can be used to test storm surge and wave models at damaged bridge sites where span displacements have been measured. In summary, the results of this study will improve the methods and equations for predicting storm surge and wave loads on bridge superstructures.

Objectives

The objective of this proposed research is to obtain bridge superstructure response to wave loading. This information will be most useful in the development of bridge retrofits and to test and improve wave load predictive methods and equations. The proposed study will also help to validate hurricane wave and storm surge models

FHWA Hydraulics R&D is currently conducting preliminary small scale wave deck response tests at the TFHRC Hydraulics Laboratory. The wave tank at TFHRC has several limitations because of the small scale.

The proposed study has to be conducted in a larger wave tank to validate and to augment tests performed at the TFHRC Hydraulics Lab. The planned study will include wave tank tests with model bridge spans, the reduction and analysis of the data and the extraction of the forces and moments required to produce the observed motion. The resulting forces and moments will then be used to test and improve existing storm surge and wave force predictive methods and equations.

Scope of Work

The scope of work consists of researching wave deck response forces, especially to determine added mass and change in added mass effects. The deck response forces will be determined by measuring deck response displacements and response accelerations.

The project will consist of the following tasks:

Task 1. Assemble a technical advisory committee that will provide oversight and guidance on all aspects of the project.

Task 2. Conduct a literature search and compile and review the pertinent technical papers and reports on this subject. Coordinate with the TFHRC Hydraulics researchers team the design of the experimental set-up.

Task 3. Construct and instrument model bridge spans. Install models in the wave tank and test/calibrate the instrumentation.

Task 4 Perform wave loading tests and measure the span response with high speed cameras and accelerometers. Tests will be conducted for a wide range of wave parameters (i.e. wave height and period). Collaborate with TFHRC Hydraulics researcher¿s team capturing bridge span response using motion tracking imagery.

Task 5. Reduce and analyze the data from the tests.

Task 6. Knowing the structure parameters (mass density, dimensions, center of mass, etc.) and the response compute the forces and moments required to produce the observed responses. Compare the force results with those produced by existing wave force predictive equations. Modify the existing equations to obtain improved predictive equations. Validate hurricane wave and storm surge modeling with scaled movements observed in the field.

Task 7. Prepare a report to document the study approach and results. The report will include improved wave load predictive methods and equations. It will also suggest bridge retrofits that will reduce bridge deck movements.

Comments

$15,000/year

The Federal Highway Administration will serve as the coordinator for this pooled-fund project. State DOT¿s will be solicited for their interest and participation in this study. Periodic reviews will be arranged to keep participating states and agencies up-to-date on current developments. These reviews may include meetings in Washington D. C. during the annual TRB Session, e-mail submittals and conference calls.

No document attached.

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