Executive Workshops on Strategies and Best Practices for State Departments of Transportation to Support Commercialization of Electric Vehicles (EV) and Infrastructure

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General Information
Solicitation Number: 1289
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Nov 02, 2010
Last Updated: Jun 12, 2015
Solicitation Expires: Jun 30, 2011
Partners: AZDOT, CA, FHWA, GADOT, OH, OR, WA, WI
Lead Organization: Washington State Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2011
Commitment End Year: 2012
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Commitments Required: $100,000.00
Commitments Received: $145,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Mustafa Mohamedali
MOHAMEM@wsdot.wa.gov
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Benjamin Hawkinson
Benjamin.Hawkinson@dot.gov
Phone: 202-366-5044
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Arizona Department of Transportation 2011 $10,000.00 Anne Ellis Mary Ann Roder 602-712-4542 mroder@azdot.gov
California Department of Transportation 2011 $20,000.00 Patrick Tyner Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Federal Highway Administration 2011 $20,000.00 Benjamin Hawkinson David Kuehn 202-366-6072 David.Kuehn@fhwa.dot.gov
Georgia Department of Transportation 2012 $10,000.00 Brian Groover Supriya Kamatkar 404-347-0552 skamatkar@dot.ga.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2011 $15,000.00 Brandon Perkins Jill Martindale 6146448173 jacquelin.martindale@dot.ohio.gov
Oregon Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Art James Michael Bufalino 503-986-2845 Michael.Bufalino@odot.state.or.us
Washington State Department of Transportation 2011 $15,000.00 Kathy Lindquist Tim Carlile 360-705-7975 carlilt@wsdot.wa.gov
Washington State Department of Transportation 2012 $15,000.00 Kathy Lindquist Tim Carlile 360-705-7975 carlilt@wsdot.wa.gov
Wisconsin Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Linda Lewis Lori Richter 608-264-8435 lori.richter@dot.wi.gov

Background

In the United States, transportation accounts for 70 percent of the nation¿s total oil consumption and produces almost 30 percent of the country¿s total greenhouse gas emissions. Passenger light-duty vehicles ¿ cars, SUVs and motorcycles ¿ account for 40 percent of the total U.S. petroleum demand. Public officials understand that if the U.S. is to address oil dependence and its harmful effects, petroleum use in light duty vehicles must be sharply reduced.

The federal government has sponsored and funded efforts to move personal auto transportation to the electric power grid. Within the last 12 months, federal aid, incentives, and programs have been created to:

¿ Assist auto manufacturers to develop electric vehicles, including $8 billion in loan guarantees to Ford, Nissan, Tesla, Frisker and others, (with authority to issue $17 billion more);

¿ Improve battery technology leading to longer battery life/capacity for these cars, including $2 billion in manufacturing grants for advanced batteries awarded to seven large battery projects and 23 smaller projects;

¿ Fund deployment of electric charging infrastructure, in homes, workplaces, and public venues. This includes $400 million for electric vehicle demonstrations such as TheEVProject and ChargeAmerica; and $300 million for demonstration programs through the U.S. Department of Energy Clean Cities program; and 200 EV charging stations funded in five cities; and

¿ Provide tax incentives for the purchase of electric vehicles and related charging equipment. Three hundred million dollars was provided for federal fleet purchases of advanced vehicles, and for private purchasers, an EV tax credit of up to $7,500 is provided for plug-ins and battery electric vehicles.

However, despite these investments to incentivize this new technology, there is currently no national forum for state transportation agencies to collaborate on coordinated state funding efforts, model policies, and best practices to support this new technology. A forum or community of practice is essential to help states maximize these federal investments and to ensure consistency among the states as this new technology is rapidly put into practice. Every major auto manufacturer is now planning or will be mass-producing an electric-drive vehicle within 24 months. By 2012, over 120 new electric vehicle models will be available for retail sale. States targeted to participate in U.S. Department of Energy demonstrations or host major transportation electrification projects include: Arizona, California, the District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. These states will serve as the test-bed for electric vehicle technologies. Legislation pending before Congress creates a new transportation electrification program providing competitive grants for up to 15 states to further electric vehicle infrastructure.

It is imperative that transportation agencies, public officials, and public policies be ready to capitalize on this massive investment. This project will especially help departments of transportation in the 12 states cited above to collaborate and share information, relevant research, policies, and practices. It will create synergies among these states and reduce the costs of potentially duplicative efforts. It will also assist other states that are (or will soon be) involved in transportation electrification efforts.

Currently Washington and Oregon DOTs informally collaborate on the West Coast Green Highway initiative to provide electric charge stations throughout the I-5 corridor. WSDOT proposes to formally expand this information sharing among the states that are currently underway in their efforts to incentivize and support the commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure.

Objectives

WSDOT proposes to collaborate with other states to establish a community of practice that can share information as the states develop strategies and best practices to support commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure. Specifically, this project will bring together executive-level representatives from fifteen states to engage in a highly interactive series of discussions, presentations, and peer-to-peer exchanges. The proposed workshops will help DOTs build their capacity and capabilities to work with private partners as well as federal, state, and local officials as transportation electrification efforts gain momentum around the country. The workshops are geared towards the state DOT executive policy level. Each state DOT will serve as the lead and can invite one additional participant from their respective state from the following categories: other state agencies (energy, ecology, or clean air agencies), governor¿s office, legislators, Regional Transportation Planning Organizations, universities, or city governments. The content of the workshops will be focused towards states that are already well underway in the process of supporting the commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure.

Papers capturing the status of participating state¿s policies supporting commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure will be developed in addition to communication materials for the web.

Scope of Work

The project will begin when $100,000 of commitments are obtained. The project duration will be one year. The project will be completed in two phases, depending on funding and needs of the participating states. The following describes potential topics that may be covered in each of the phases. The topics and phasing may change depending on the interest of the participating states.

Phase I: Funded at $100,000, will consist of the following:

1. An executive level workshop will be organized and conducted among the participating states. The meeting locations will be determined. Potential Phase I workshop topics:

 Electric Vehicle Infrastructure

¿ Lease of state land for electric charging stations;

¿ Electric charging stations at rest areas and DOT maintenance facilities;

¿ Consistent interstate way-finder signage;

¿ Parking and ADA policies as applied to EV charging stations;

¿ Agreements with power companies/public utilities for EV charging stations;

¿ Public/private partnerships with EV charge station providers to fund infrastructure;

¿ Technology standards and data collection for electric vehicles;

2. Background paper capturing where each of the participating states are in their development of strategies and policies to support the commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure. The background paper will be completed before the first workshop and sent out to meeting participants prior to the workshop.

3. Prepare a compendium of the workshops¿ discussions and findings. The compendia will be prepared after each workshop and delivered to participating states and other interested parties.

4. Presentations to be delivered at the workshop that cover the state of knowledge of electric vehicles and infrastructure and help tee up discussions at the workshops.

Phase II: Additional funding commitments of $100,000 will include the following scope of work:

1. A second Executive Level Workshop of consisting of potential topics not covered at the first workshop, including topics listed below. See below for a list of potential topics to be covered at the workshop.

Potential Phase II workshop topics:

 Electric Vehicle Policies and Electric Vehicle Fleet

¿ State incentives to encourage investment in electric vehicles and infrastructure

¿ Laws regulating type and use of electric vehicles on state highways;

¿ Transportation tax policies related to electric vehicles;

¿ HOV lane access for electric vehicles;

¿ Electric vehicle purchase orders and bulk pricing;

¿ Coordinated procurement for EVs with suppliers and other examples.

2. Status updates paper: An addendum to the Background Paper that provides any changes to the states¿ status. This will be completed and sent out before the second workshop.

3. Communication and outreach materials developed for posting on the web.

Comments

Minimum state commitment is $10,000. Preferred state commitment is $20,000. If WSDOT receives sufficient commitments before January 1, 2011, we intend to begin this TPF early.

No document attached.

Executive Workshops on Strategies and Best Practices for State Departments of Transportation to Support Commercialization of Electric Vehicles (EV) and Infrastructure

General Information
Solicitation Number: 1289
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Nov 02, 2010
Last Updated: Jun 12, 2015
Solicitation Expires: Jun 30, 2011
Partners: AZDOT, CA, FHWA, GADOT, OH, OR, WA, WI
Lead Organization: Washington State Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2011
Commitment End Year: 2012
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Commitments Required: $100,000.00
Commitments Received: $145,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Mustafa Mohamedali
MOHAMEM@wsdot.wa.gov
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Benjamin Hawkinson
Benjamin.Hawkinson@dot.gov
Phone: 202-366-5044
Commitments by Organizations
Agency Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Arizona Department of Transportation 2011 $10,000.00 Anne Ellis Mary Ann Roder 602-712-4542 mroder@azdot.gov
California Department of Transportation 2011 $20,000.00 Patrick Tyner Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Federal Highway Administration 2011 $20,000.00 Benjamin Hawkinson David Kuehn 202-366-6072 David.Kuehn@fhwa.dot.gov
Georgia Department of Transportation 2012 $10,000.00 Brian Groover Supriya Kamatkar 404-347-0552 skamatkar@dot.ga.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2011 $15,000.00 Brandon Perkins Jill Martindale 6146448173 jacquelin.martindale@dot.ohio.gov
Oregon Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Art James Michael Bufalino 503-986-2845 Michael.Bufalino@odot.state.or.us
Washington State Department of Transportation 2011 $15,000.00 Kathy Lindquist Tim Carlile 360-705-7975 carlilt@wsdot.wa.gov
Washington State Department of Transportation 2012 $15,000.00 Kathy Lindquist Tim Carlile 360-705-7975 carlilt@wsdot.wa.gov
Wisconsin Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Linda Lewis Lori Richter 608-264-8435 lori.richter@dot.wi.gov

Background

In the United States, transportation accounts for 70 percent of the nation¿s total oil consumption and produces almost 30 percent of the country¿s total greenhouse gas emissions. Passenger light-duty vehicles ¿ cars, SUVs and motorcycles ¿ account for 40 percent of the total U.S. petroleum demand. Public officials understand that if the U.S. is to address oil dependence and its harmful effects, petroleum use in light duty vehicles must be sharply reduced.

The federal government has sponsored and funded efforts to move personal auto transportation to the electric power grid. Within the last 12 months, federal aid, incentives, and programs have been created to:

¿ Assist auto manufacturers to develop electric vehicles, including $8 billion in loan guarantees to Ford, Nissan, Tesla, Frisker and others, (with authority to issue $17 billion more);

¿ Improve battery technology leading to longer battery life/capacity for these cars, including $2 billion in manufacturing grants for advanced batteries awarded to seven large battery projects and 23 smaller projects;

¿ Fund deployment of electric charging infrastructure, in homes, workplaces, and public venues. This includes $400 million for electric vehicle demonstrations such as TheEVProject and ChargeAmerica; and $300 million for demonstration programs through the U.S. Department of Energy Clean Cities program; and 200 EV charging stations funded in five cities; and

¿ Provide tax incentives for the purchase of electric vehicles and related charging equipment. Three hundred million dollars was provided for federal fleet purchases of advanced vehicles, and for private purchasers, an EV tax credit of up to $7,500 is provided for plug-ins and battery electric vehicles.

However, despite these investments to incentivize this new technology, there is currently no national forum for state transportation agencies to collaborate on coordinated state funding efforts, model policies, and best practices to support this new technology. A forum or community of practice is essential to help states maximize these federal investments and to ensure consistency among the states as this new technology is rapidly put into practice. Every major auto manufacturer is now planning or will be mass-producing an electric-drive vehicle within 24 months. By 2012, over 120 new electric vehicle models will be available for retail sale. States targeted to participate in U.S. Department of Energy demonstrations or host major transportation electrification projects include: Arizona, California, the District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. These states will serve as the test-bed for electric vehicle technologies. Legislation pending before Congress creates a new transportation electrification program providing competitive grants for up to 15 states to further electric vehicle infrastructure.

It is imperative that transportation agencies, public officials, and public policies be ready to capitalize on this massive investment. This project will especially help departments of transportation in the 12 states cited above to collaborate and share information, relevant research, policies, and practices. It will create synergies among these states and reduce the costs of potentially duplicative efforts. It will also assist other states that are (or will soon be) involved in transportation electrification efforts.

Currently Washington and Oregon DOTs informally collaborate on the West Coast Green Highway initiative to provide electric charge stations throughout the I-5 corridor. WSDOT proposes to formally expand this information sharing among the states that are currently underway in their efforts to incentivize and support the commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure.

Objectives

WSDOT proposes to collaborate with other states to establish a community of practice that can share information as the states develop strategies and best practices to support commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure. Specifically, this project will bring together executive-level representatives from fifteen states to engage in a highly interactive series of discussions, presentations, and peer-to-peer exchanges. The proposed workshops will help DOTs build their capacity and capabilities to work with private partners as well as federal, state, and local officials as transportation electrification efforts gain momentum around the country. The workshops are geared towards the state DOT executive policy level. Each state DOT will serve as the lead and can invite one additional participant from their respective state from the following categories: other state agencies (energy, ecology, or clean air agencies), governor¿s office, legislators, Regional Transportation Planning Organizations, universities, or city governments. The content of the workshops will be focused towards states that are already well underway in the process of supporting the commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure.

Papers capturing the status of participating state¿s policies supporting commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure will be developed in addition to communication materials for the web.

Scope of Work

The project will begin when $100,000 of commitments are obtained. The project duration will be one year. The project will be completed in two phases, depending on funding and needs of the participating states. The following describes potential topics that may be covered in each of the phases. The topics and phasing may change depending on the interest of the participating states.

Phase I: Funded at $100,000, will consist of the following:

1. An executive level workshop will be organized and conducted among the participating states. The meeting locations will be determined. Potential Phase I workshop topics:

 Electric Vehicle Infrastructure

¿ Lease of state land for electric charging stations;

¿ Electric charging stations at rest areas and DOT maintenance facilities;

¿ Consistent interstate way-finder signage;

¿ Parking and ADA policies as applied to EV charging stations;

¿ Agreements with power companies/public utilities for EV charging stations;

¿ Public/private partnerships with EV charge station providers to fund infrastructure;

¿ Technology standards and data collection for electric vehicles;

2. Background paper capturing where each of the participating states are in their development of strategies and policies to support the commercialization of electric vehicles and infrastructure. The background paper will be completed before the first workshop and sent out to meeting participants prior to the workshop.

3. Prepare a compendium of the workshops¿ discussions and findings. The compendia will be prepared after each workshop and delivered to participating states and other interested parties.

4. Presentations to be delivered at the workshop that cover the state of knowledge of electric vehicles and infrastructure and help tee up discussions at the workshops.

Phase II: Additional funding commitments of $100,000 will include the following scope of work:

1. A second Executive Level Workshop of consisting of potential topics not covered at the first workshop, including topics listed below. See below for a list of potential topics to be covered at the workshop.

Potential Phase II workshop topics:

 Electric Vehicle Policies and Electric Vehicle Fleet

¿ State incentives to encourage investment in electric vehicles and infrastructure

¿ Laws regulating type and use of electric vehicles on state highways;

¿ Transportation tax policies related to electric vehicles;

¿ HOV lane access for electric vehicles;

¿ Electric vehicle purchase orders and bulk pricing;

¿ Coordinated procurement for EVs with suppliers and other examples.

2. Status updates paper: An addendum to the Background Paper that provides any changes to the states¿ status. This will be completed and sent out before the second workshop.

3. Communication and outreach materials developed for posting on the web.

Comments

Minimum state commitment is $10,000. Preferred state commitment is $20,000. If WSDOT receives sufficient commitments before January 1, 2011, we intend to begin this TPF early.

No document attached.

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