Monitoring and Performance Evaluation of Instrumented Pavement Installations for Mechanistic Pavement Response Model Validation, Enhancement and Design Procedures

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General Information
Solicitation Number: 1328
Status: Solicitation withdrawn
Date Posted: May 30, 2012
Last Updated: Jun 24, 2013
Solicitation Expires: May 30, 2013
Partners: NY
Lead Organization: Ohio Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2013
Commitment End Year: 2017
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Commitments Required: $1,500,000.00
Commitments Received: $600,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Cynthia Jones
cynthia.jones@dot.ohio.gov
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Fred Faridazar
fred.faridazar@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 202-493-3076
Study Champion(s): Wes Yang
wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
Phone: 518-457-4660
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
New York State Department of Transportation 2013 $150,000.00 Wes Yang Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2014 $150,000.00 Wes Yang Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2015 $150,000.00 Wes Yang Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2016 $150,000.00 Wes Yang Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov

Background

The MEPDG has two components, one simulates performance and the other simulates load response. The load response data is used as software input to predict pavement performance. Previous calibrations of the MEPDG software have focused on comparing the software’s predictions of pavement performance to actual performance data, usually obtained from the Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) database. It is proposed to calibrate the load response model against actual data collected on instrumented pavement sections to improve the program’s prediction of load response based on input material properties. This will enhance the calibration of the MEPDG model.

Several states, in particular New York and Ohio, have constructed instrumented test roads for the purpose of acquiring such data on pavements designed according to practices used in the state and built using available materials under local conditions. Many of the sensors installed in these test roads are still functioning, and additional useful data can be obtained from them.

The previous pooled fund project entitled “Monitoring and Modeling of Pavement Response and Performance” (TPF-5(121)) included monitoring of seven sites in Ohio (US Route 30 in Wayne County, US Route 23 in Delaware County (the SHRP Test Road), US Route 50 in Athens County, Interstate 77 in Stark County, and US Route 33 in Athens, Logan, and Meigs Counties) and five sites in New York (Interstate 490 in Rochester, Interstate 90 in Syracuse, State Route 9A in New York City (Freedom Tower site), and Interstate 86 in Angelica and Olean). Some of these sites included the installation of new or replacement sensors, including several test sections on US Route 23 in Ohio, and the sites in New York City, Syracuse, and Angelica, New York. The link to web page for TPF-5(121) "Monitoring and Modeling of Pavement Response and Performance" is: http://www.pooledfund.org/Details/Study/353. The final report associated with this project (Ohio State Job No. 134287) can be found with the following link: http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/SPR/Research/reportsandplans/Reports/2010/Pavement/134287_FR.pdf. Task B was completed in May 2012 and the final report from that task can be found with the following links:

Volume 1:

http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/SPR/Research/reportsandplans/Reports/2012/Pavements/134287_Vol1_%20FR.pdf

Volume 2:

http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/SPR/Research/reportsandplans/Reports/2012/Pavements/134287_Vol2_%20FR.pdf

Volume 3:

http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/SPR/Research/reportsandplans/Reports/2012/Pavements/134287_Vol3_FR.pdf

A new test perpetual pavement will be constructed on the SHRP Test Road on US Route 23 in the summer of 2012 to determine the optimum thickness of the perpetual pavement design via a performance comparison. The perpetual pavement design will have sections with thicknesses of 13 in (33 cm) and 15 in (38 cm) on the main road, and thicknesses of 11 in (28 cm) and 13 in (33 cm) on the low volume lanes. Each of these test sections will be instrumented to monitor various parameters. A weather station and a weigh-in-motion unit are already in place to collect environmental and traffic data. Load response parameters that will be monitored will include: surface and intermediate layer deflections measured with LVDTs, horizontal pavement strains measured with strain gauges, and subgrade pressure measured with pressure cells. Monitoring will include environmental parameters during and after paving, and controlled load vehicle tests. This study will provide participating states and the Federal Highway Administration with an opportunity to request specific additional instrumentation or monitoring customized to their needs, including the ability to compare different (or additional) materials, construction techniques, pavement designs, and load configurations specific to local conditions.

States who

Objectives

This project has these objectives:

1. Compute load response using the software that was used for MEPDG design, and collect actual load response data to verify the load response model.

2. Organize and analyze existing pavement section response data for validation of enhanced mechanistic pavement response and performance models.

3. Identify how pavement performance is affected by: properties of materials, the construction method (including cold in-place recycling), pavement thickness, and environmental factors. By showing how each factor affects performance, the collected data will be of value in the pavement design process. Outcomes and recommendations from this project can be implemented very quickly.

4. Construct new instrumented performance sections to fill gaps in existing datasets.

5. Organize new and existing material characterization datasets into a relational database with the capability to query in formats needed for DARwin-ME inputs.

6. Monitor performance of test sections according to the LTPP protocol for consideration of inclusion to the National Pavement Performance Database.

7. Document all pavement characterization, structural design, instrumentation and performance modeling procedures into a guideline format for future efforts.

8. Provide a public access web portal for access to all data and documentation.

There are a number of instrumented pavements in New York and Ohio that continue to provide useful data for pavement modeling and design. To meet the objectives of this project it is essential to ensure the continued monitoring and performance evaluation of these pavements over the project period to gather further data to improve calibration and validation of the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) for these states and others that wish to participate. The monitoring efforts will include:

• Examination of the performance of each site,

• Controlled load tests at sites where functioning sensors have been installed and are operational,

• Nondestructive testing of pavements,

• Testing of material specimens where needed, and

Additional sites may be studied, including performance assessments, nondestructive testing, and collection of material specimens for testing.

The data gathered for this project will be analyzed and compiled into a form useful for use in the MEPDG. If a trend is noticed that will impact the design process, it will be reported. While the data will be gathered at specific locations in Ohio and New York, the load response and material data will have applicability to other states as well.

Scope of Work

The project will include the following tasks:

1. Data collection during controlled load tests, field sampling, and pavement surveys on Interstate 490, Interstate 90, State Route 9A, and Interstate 86 (two sites) in New York and on US Routes 23, 30, 33, and 50 and on Interstate 77 in Ohio using SHRP protocols and to meet the objectives of TPF-5(121). Additional sites may be included at the request of funding agencies. Monitoring of instrumentation already installed at existing test pavements, including (where available):

• load response parameters: surface and intermediate layer deflection, horizontal pavement strain, and subgrade pressure

• traffic load data collected by weigh-in-motion equipment

• weather parameters: air temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, solar radiation, wind speed, and wind direction

• pavement and soil temperature

• base and subgrade volumetric moisture content

• depth of frost penetration

• water table depth

2. Install sensors and monitor response in four new perpetual pavement test sections built on the Ohio SHRP Test Road on US Route 23. This will include two sections of total asphalt thicknesses 13 in (33 cm) and 15 in (38 cm) on the main line and two sections of total asphalt thickness 11 in (28 cm) and 13 in (38 cm) on the low-volume access road. ), each on 6 in (15 cm) Dense Graded Aggregate Base (DGAB):

• load response parameters: surface and intermediate layer deflection, horizontal pavement strain*, and subgrade pressure

* Strains will be monitored in three dimensions.

• traffic load data collected by weigh-in-motion equipment

• weather parameters: air temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, solar radiation, wind speed, and wind direction

• pavement temperature

• base and subgrade volumetric moisture content

Sensor responses will be monitored during controlled vehicle load tests involving the following tire configurations: standard single axle, tandem axle, and super single axle with wide-based tire. These tests will be augmented with Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD), Portable Seismic Pavement Analyzer (PSPA), and Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP) measurements.

Materials used in the test sections will be fully characterized and determined for Level 1 MEPDG inputs. DCP tests will be used. Asphalt tests will include dynamic modulus and beam fatigue tests; DGAB and subgrade soil resilient moduli will also be measured.

These new sections will provide opportunities to do the following:

a. Shadow new and rehabilitation DARWin-ME designs for potential future performance comparisons

b. Evaluate new instrumentation technologies

c. Evaluate emerging material types and test methods (i.e. WMA, GTR, CRM, VECD Fatigue, Fn, etc.)

d. Create fully characterized material datasets formatted to be compatible with DARWin-ME

e. Provide opportunity to compare existing pavement structural response model predictions to field measurements with WIM and climate data for support.

f. Provide opportunity to verify and validated new emerging pavement structural response models.

3. Laboratory testing of samples collected at sites determined to be of interest. Tests by type of material include all parameters required by the MEPDG for asphalt concrete, Portland cement concrete, base, and subgrade.

4. Evaluation of cold in-place recycling (CIPR) methods used to rehabilitate high-traffic pavements. In this task, pavements will be rehabilitated using CIPR, including instrumented test sections designed to monitor surface displacement, strains, and subgrade pressure. A control section rehabilitated using conventional hot in-place recycling will be similarly instrumented as a control. Pavement response will be measured during controlled vehicle load testing and FWD drops, both at time of installation and afterwards during hot summer weather conditions. Instrumentation will be monitored for duration of project. Specimens of CIPR and control pavements will be col

Comments

Recommended contribution is $30,000/year

No document attached.

Monitoring and Performance Evaluation of Instrumented Pavement Installations for Mechanistic Pavement Response Model Validation, Enhancement and Design Procedures

General Information
Solicitation Number: 1328
Status: Solicitation withdrawn
Date Posted: May 30, 2012
Last Updated: Jun 24, 2013
Solicitation Expires: May 30, 2013
Partners: NY
Lead Organization: Ohio Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2013
Commitment End Year: 2017
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Commitments Required: $1,500,000.00
Commitments Received: $600,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Cynthia Jones
cynthia.jones@dot.ohio.gov
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Fred Faridazar
fred.faridazar@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 202-493-3076
Commitments by Organizations
Agency Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
New York State Department of Transportation 2013 $150,000.00 Wes Yang Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2014 $150,000.00 Wes Yang Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2015 $150,000.00 Wes Yang Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2016 $150,000.00 Wes Yang Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov

Background

The MEPDG has two components, one simulates performance and the other simulates load response. The load response data is used as software input to predict pavement performance. Previous calibrations of the MEPDG software have focused on comparing the software’s predictions of pavement performance to actual performance data, usually obtained from the Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) database. It is proposed to calibrate the load response model against actual data collected on instrumented pavement sections to improve the program’s prediction of load response based on input material properties. This will enhance the calibration of the MEPDG model.

Several states, in particular New York and Ohio, have constructed instrumented test roads for the purpose of acquiring such data on pavements designed according to practices used in the state and built using available materials under local conditions. Many of the sensors installed in these test roads are still functioning, and additional useful data can be obtained from them.

The previous pooled fund project entitled “Monitoring and Modeling of Pavement Response and Performance” (TPF-5(121)) included monitoring of seven sites in Ohio (US Route 30 in Wayne County, US Route 23 in Delaware County (the SHRP Test Road), US Route 50 in Athens County, Interstate 77 in Stark County, and US Route 33 in Athens, Logan, and Meigs Counties) and five sites in New York (Interstate 490 in Rochester, Interstate 90 in Syracuse, State Route 9A in New York City (Freedom Tower site), and Interstate 86 in Angelica and Olean). Some of these sites included the installation of new or replacement sensors, including several test sections on US Route 23 in Ohio, and the sites in New York City, Syracuse, and Angelica, New York. The link to web page for TPF-5(121) "Monitoring and Modeling of Pavement Response and Performance" is: http://www.pooledfund.org/Details/Study/353. The final report associated with this project (Ohio State Job No. 134287) can be found with the following link: http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/SPR/Research/reportsandplans/Reports/2010/Pavement/134287_FR.pdf. Task B was completed in May 2012 and the final report from that task can be found with the following links:

Volume 1:

http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/SPR/Research/reportsandplans/Reports/2012/Pavements/134287_Vol1_%20FR.pdf

Volume 2:

http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/SPR/Research/reportsandplans/Reports/2012/Pavements/134287_Vol2_%20FR.pdf

Volume 3:

http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/SPR/Research/reportsandplans/Reports/2012/Pavements/134287_Vol3_FR.pdf

A new test perpetual pavement will be constructed on the SHRP Test Road on US Route 23 in the summer of 2012 to determine the optimum thickness of the perpetual pavement design via a performance comparison. The perpetual pavement design will have sections with thicknesses of 13 in (33 cm) and 15 in (38 cm) on the main road, and thicknesses of 11 in (28 cm) and 13 in (33 cm) on the low volume lanes. Each of these test sections will be instrumented to monitor various parameters. A weather station and a weigh-in-motion unit are already in place to collect environmental and traffic data. Load response parameters that will be monitored will include: surface and intermediate layer deflections measured with LVDTs, horizontal pavement strains measured with strain gauges, and subgrade pressure measured with pressure cells. Monitoring will include environmental parameters during and after paving, and controlled load vehicle tests. This study will provide participating states and the Federal Highway Administration with an opportunity to request specific additional instrumentation or monitoring customized to their needs, including the ability to compare different (or additional) materials, construction techniques, pavement designs, and load configurations specific to local conditions.

States who

Objectives

This project has these objectives:

1. Compute load response using the software that was used for MEPDG design, and collect actual load response data to verify the load response model.

2. Organize and analyze existing pavement section response data for validation of enhanced mechanistic pavement response and performance models.

3. Identify how pavement performance is affected by: properties of materials, the construction method (including cold in-place recycling), pavement thickness, and environmental factors. By showing how each factor affects performance, the collected data will be of value in the pavement design process. Outcomes and recommendations from this project can be implemented very quickly.

4. Construct new instrumented performance sections to fill gaps in existing datasets.

5. Organize new and existing material characterization datasets into a relational database with the capability to query in formats needed for DARwin-ME inputs.

6. Monitor performance of test sections according to the LTPP protocol for consideration of inclusion to the National Pavement Performance Database.

7. Document all pavement characterization, structural design, instrumentation and performance modeling procedures into a guideline format for future efforts.

8. Provide a public access web portal for access to all data and documentation.

There are a number of instrumented pavements in New York and Ohio that continue to provide useful data for pavement modeling and design. To meet the objectives of this project it is essential to ensure the continued monitoring and performance evaluation of these pavements over the project period to gather further data to improve calibration and validation of the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) for these states and others that wish to participate. The monitoring efforts will include:

• Examination of the performance of each site,

• Controlled load tests at sites where functioning sensors have been installed and are operational,

• Nondestructive testing of pavements,

• Testing of material specimens where needed, and

Additional sites may be studied, including performance assessments, nondestructive testing, and collection of material specimens for testing.

The data gathered for this project will be analyzed and compiled into a form useful for use in the MEPDG. If a trend is noticed that will impact the design process, it will be reported. While the data will be gathered at specific locations in Ohio and New York, the load response and material data will have applicability to other states as well.

Scope of Work

The project will include the following tasks:

1. Data collection during controlled load tests, field sampling, and pavement surveys on Interstate 490, Interstate 90, State Route 9A, and Interstate 86 (two sites) in New York and on US Routes 23, 30, 33, and 50 and on Interstate 77 in Ohio using SHRP protocols and to meet the objectives of TPF-5(121). Additional sites may be included at the request of funding agencies. Monitoring of instrumentation already installed at existing test pavements, including (where available):

• load response parameters: surface and intermediate layer deflection, horizontal pavement strain, and subgrade pressure

• traffic load data collected by weigh-in-motion equipment

• weather parameters: air temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, solar radiation, wind speed, and wind direction

• pavement and soil temperature

• base and subgrade volumetric moisture content

• depth of frost penetration

• water table depth

2. Install sensors and monitor response in four new perpetual pavement test sections built on the Ohio SHRP Test Road on US Route 23. This will include two sections of total asphalt thicknesses 13 in (33 cm) and 15 in (38 cm) on the main line and two sections of total asphalt thickness 11 in (28 cm) and 13 in (38 cm) on the low-volume access road. ), each on 6 in (15 cm) Dense Graded Aggregate Base (DGAB):

• load response parameters: surface and intermediate layer deflection, horizontal pavement strain*, and subgrade pressure

* Strains will be monitored in three dimensions.

• traffic load data collected by weigh-in-motion equipment

• weather parameters: air temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, solar radiation, wind speed, and wind direction

• pavement temperature

• base and subgrade volumetric moisture content

Sensor responses will be monitored during controlled vehicle load tests involving the following tire configurations: standard single axle, tandem axle, and super single axle with wide-based tire. These tests will be augmented with Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD), Portable Seismic Pavement Analyzer (PSPA), and Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP) measurements.

Materials used in the test sections will be fully characterized and determined for Level 1 MEPDG inputs. DCP tests will be used. Asphalt tests will include dynamic modulus and beam fatigue tests; DGAB and subgrade soil resilient moduli will also be measured.

These new sections will provide opportunities to do the following:

a. Shadow new and rehabilitation DARWin-ME designs for potential future performance comparisons

b. Evaluate new instrumentation technologies

c. Evaluate emerging material types and test methods (i.e. WMA, GTR, CRM, VECD Fatigue, Fn, etc.)

d. Create fully characterized material datasets formatted to be compatible with DARWin-ME

e. Provide opportunity to compare existing pavement structural response model predictions to field measurements with WIM and climate data for support.

f. Provide opportunity to verify and validated new emerging pavement structural response models.

3. Laboratory testing of samples collected at sites determined to be of interest. Tests by type of material include all parameters required by the MEPDG for asphalt concrete, Portland cement concrete, base, and subgrade.

4. Evaluation of cold in-place recycling (CIPR) methods used to rehabilitate high-traffic pavements. In this task, pavements will be rehabilitated using CIPR, including instrumented test sections designed to monitor surface displacement, strains, and subgrade pressure. A control section rehabilitated using conventional hot in-place recycling will be similarly instrumented as a control. Pavement response will be measured during controlled vehicle load testing and FWD drops, both at time of installation and afterwards during hot summer weather conditions. Instrumentation will be monitored for duration of project. Specimens of CIPR and control pavements will be col

Comments

Recommended contribution is $30,000/year

No document attached.

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