Improvements to the Infrastructure Carbon Estimator (ICE)

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General Information
Study Number: TPF-5(362)
Lead Organization: Minnesota Department of Transportation
Solicitation Number: 1444
Partners: CA, CO, FHWA, IADOT, MN, NY, TX, WA
Status: Cleared by FHWA
Est. Completion Date:
Contract/Other Number:
Last Updated: Dec 30, 2019
Contract End Date:
Financial Summary
Contract Amount:
Total Commitments Received: $455,000.00
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Timothy Sexton
timothy.sexton@state.mn.us
Phone: 651-366-3622
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): John Davies
JohnG.Davies@dot.gov
Phone: 202- 366-6039
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
California Department of Transportation 2018 $30,000.00 Pritpall Bhullar Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Colorado Department of Transportation 2018 $10,000.00 David Reeves David Reeves 303-757-9518 david.reeves@state.co.us
Colorado Department of Transportation 2019 $10,000.00 David Reeves David Reeves 303-757-9518 david.reeves@state.co.us
Colorado Department of Transportation 2020 $10,000.00 David Reeves David Reeves 303-757-9518 david.reeves@state.co.us
Federal Highway Administration 2017 $250,000.00 John Davies John Davies (202) 366-6039 JohnG.Davies@dot.gov
Iowa Department of Transportation 2020 $30,000.00 Madeline Schmitt Cheryl Cowie 515-239-1447 Cheryl.Cowie@iowadot.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2017 $10,000.00 Timothy Sexton Debbie Sinclair 651-336-3746 debbie.sinclair@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2018 $10,000.00 Timothy Sexton Debbie Sinclair 651-336-3746 debbie.sinclair@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2019 $10,000.00 Timothy Sexton Debbie Sinclair 651-336-3746 debbie.sinclair@state.mn.us
New York State Department of Transportation 2017 $10,000.00 Shengxin Jin Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2018 $10,000.00 Shengxin Jin Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2019 $10,000.00 Shengxin Jin Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2018 $15,000.00 Jackie Ploch Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2019 $15,000.00 Jackie Ploch Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2020 $15,000.00 Jackie Ploch Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov
Washington State Department of Transportation 2019 $10,000.00 Karin Landsberg Jon Peterson 360-705-7499 peterjn@wsdot.wa.gov

Study Description

Some state departments of transportation (DOTs) and many Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) have begun to estimate vehicle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation systems. However, only a few have started to evaluate infrastructure-related energy consumption and GHG emissions, which can make significant contribution to the environmental footprint of the transportation system (see, for example, “Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States,” Mikhail V Chester, UC Berkeley Institute of Transportation Studies, August 2008).

Quantifying infrastructure energy and GHG emissions can be an important element of environmental analysis at the national, State and local levels. Many state climate action plans and MPO GHG reduction plans include infrastructure strategies such as HOV/HOT lanes, bus and rail transit, congestion reduction, and bicycle and pedestrian projects. Without understanding of the construction and maintenance impacts, planners cannot know whether these projects truly reduce lifecycle GHG emissions sufficiently to meet GHG reduction targets in state climate action plans or other GHG planning documents.

In 2014, FHWA developed a relatively simple to support analysis of infrastructure-related GHG emissions at the planning and/or project-level: the Infrastructure Carbon Estimator (ICE). FHWA has been able to make modest improvements to the tool over time but more substantial updates are needed based on input from stakeholders/users of the tool.

By pooling resources, agencies will be able to conduct more extensive studies across a greater range of conditions than could be done by a single agency with only its own funds. By collaborating, sharing information, and conducting impromptu surveys, agencies will benefit from each other's experiences and avoid the duplication of research efforts. The outcomes of these projects will help agencies get the maximum financial benefit out of their investments in materials, equipment, and technologies.

Objectives

The project intends to make the following improvements to the ICE tool, based on stakeholder feedback:

1. Incorporate new research on infrastructure embodied energy and lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions

2. Add analysis of new/additional project types

3. Address GHG reductions from additional mitigation strategies

4. Tailor outputs to better address the energy and GHG emissions from transportation project alternatives and transportation plans

5. Make the interface more intuitive and easier to use

Scope of Work

The following tasks are anticipated for the project:

1. Create oversight committee to serve as project advisors made of pooled fund partners

2. Develop a detailed work plan

3. Identify model interface improvements that usability for planning- and NEPA-level analysis

4. Incorporate new research on infrastructure lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, including lifecycle framework studies and models (e.g., Rutgers University GASACAP model.)

5. Add new project types, roadway elements, and mitigation strategies

6. Pilot test the tool, using project examples or plans from pooled fund States

7. Incorporate feedback from the pilot test into a final version of the tool

8. Update model documentation

9. Develop training materials and conduct webinar-based training

Comments

At least three partners, including FHWA, are needed to each contribute a minimum annual commitment of $10,000 per year for three years.

Documents Attached
Title File/Link Type Privacy Download
Approved Waiver Memo Approval of SP&R Waiver Pooled Fund Solicitation #1444.pdf Memorandum Public
Acceptance Memo ICE Acceptance Letter.pdf Memorandum Public
Waiver Request Approval of SP&R Waiver Pooled Fund Solicitation #1444.pdf Other Public
Quarterly Report - First Quarter TPF5-362_ICE_Quarterly Report Template-_20180402.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Quartely Report 2019-Q4 Quarterly Progress Report Public
Quarterly Report 2020 Q1 TPF5-362_ICE_Quarterly Report_2020_Q1.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Quarterly Report 2020 Q3 TPF5-362-ICE-Quarterly-Report-2020-Q3.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Documents Attached
Title File/Link Type Privacy Download
100% Waiver Request Approval of SP&R Waiver Pooled Fund Solicitation #1444.pdf Memorandum Public

Improvements to the Infrastructure Carbon Estimator (ICE)

General Information
Study Number: TPF-5(362)
Lead Organization: Minnesota Department of Transportation
Solicitation Number: 1444
Partners: CA, CO, FHWA, IADOT, MN, NY, TX, WA
Status: Cleared by FHWA
Est. Completion Date:
Contract/Other Number:
Last Updated: Dec 30, 2019
Contract End Date:
Financial Summary
Contract Amount:
Total Commitments Received: $455,000.00
100% SP&R Approval:
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Timothy Sexton
timothy.sexton@state.mn.us
Phone: 651-366-3622
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): John Davies
JohnG.Davies@dot.gov
Phone: 202- 366-6039
Commitments by Organizations
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
California Department of Transportation 2018 $30,000.00 Pritpall Bhullar Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Colorado Department of Transportation 2018 $10,000.00 David Reeves David Reeves 303-757-9518 david.reeves@state.co.us
Colorado Department of Transportation 2019 $10,000.00 David Reeves David Reeves 303-757-9518 david.reeves@state.co.us
Colorado Department of Transportation 2020 $10,000.00 David Reeves David Reeves 303-757-9518 david.reeves@state.co.us
Federal Highway Administration 2017 $250,000.00 John Davies John Davies (202) 366-6039 JohnG.Davies@dot.gov
Iowa Department of Transportation 2020 $30,000.00 Madeline Schmitt Cheryl Cowie 515-239-1447 Cheryl.Cowie@iowadot.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2017 $10,000.00 Timothy Sexton Debbie Sinclair 651-336-3746 debbie.sinclair@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2018 $10,000.00 Timothy Sexton Debbie Sinclair 651-336-3746 debbie.sinclair@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2019 $10,000.00 Timothy Sexton Debbie Sinclair 651-336-3746 debbie.sinclair@state.mn.us
New York State Department of Transportation 2017 $10,000.00 Shengxin Jin Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2018 $10,000.00 Shengxin Jin Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2019 $10,000.00 Shengxin Jin Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2018 $15,000.00 Jackie Ploch Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2019 $15,000.00 Jackie Ploch Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2020 $15,000.00 Jackie Ploch Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov
Washington State Department of Transportation 2019 $10,000.00 Karin Landsberg Jon Peterson 360-705-7499 peterjn@wsdot.wa.gov

Study Description

Study Description

Some state departments of transportation (DOTs) and many Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) have begun to estimate vehicle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation systems. However, only a few have started to evaluate infrastructure-related energy consumption and GHG emissions, which can make significant contribution to the environmental footprint of the transportation system (see, for example, “Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States,” Mikhail V Chester, UC Berkeley Institute of Transportation Studies, August 2008).

Quantifying infrastructure energy and GHG emissions can be an important element of environmental analysis at the national, State and local levels. Many state climate action plans and MPO GHG reduction plans include infrastructure strategies such as HOV/HOT lanes, bus and rail transit, congestion reduction, and bicycle and pedestrian projects. Without understanding of the construction and maintenance impacts, planners cannot know whether these projects truly reduce lifecycle GHG emissions sufficiently to meet GHG reduction targets in state climate action plans or other GHG planning documents.

In 2014, FHWA developed a relatively simple to support analysis of infrastructure-related GHG emissions at the planning and/or project-level: the Infrastructure Carbon Estimator (ICE). FHWA has been able to make modest improvements to the tool over time but more substantial updates are needed based on input from stakeholders/users of the tool.

By pooling resources, agencies will be able to conduct more extensive studies across a greater range of conditions than could be done by a single agency with only its own funds. By collaborating, sharing information, and conducting impromptu surveys, agencies will benefit from each other's experiences and avoid the duplication of research efforts. The outcomes of these projects will help agencies get the maximum financial benefit out of their investments in materials, equipment, and technologies.

Objectives

The project intends to make the following improvements to the ICE tool, based on stakeholder feedback:

1. Incorporate new research on infrastructure embodied energy and lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions

2. Add analysis of new/additional project types

3. Address GHG reductions from additional mitigation strategies

4. Tailor outputs to better address the energy and GHG emissions from transportation project alternatives and transportation plans

5. Make the interface more intuitive and easier to use

Scope of Work

The following tasks are anticipated for the project:

1. Create oversight committee to serve as project advisors made of pooled fund partners

2. Develop a detailed work plan

3. Identify model interface improvements that usability for planning- and NEPA-level analysis

4. Incorporate new research on infrastructure lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, including lifecycle framework studies and models (e.g., Rutgers University GASACAP model.)

5. Add new project types, roadway elements, and mitigation strategies

6. Pilot test the tool, using project examples or plans from pooled fund States

7. Incorporate feedback from the pilot test into a final version of the tool

8. Update model documentation

9. Develop training materials and conduct webinar-based training

Comments

At least three partners, including FHWA, are needed to each contribute a minimum annual commitment of $10,000 per year for three years.

Title File/Link Type Private
Approved Waiver Memo Approval of SP&R Waiver Pooled Fund Solicitation #1444.pdf Memorandum Public
Acceptance Memo ICE Acceptance Letter.pdf Memorandum Public
Waiver Request Approval of SP&R Waiver Pooled Fund Solicitation #1444.pdf Other Public
Quarterly Report - First Quarter TPF5-362_ICE_Quarterly Report Template-_20180402.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Quartely Report 2019-Q4 Quarterly Progress Report Public
Quarterly Report 2020 Q1 TPF5-362_ICE_Quarterly Report_2020_Q1.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Quarterly Report 2020 Q3 TPF5-362-ICE-Quarterly-Report-2020-Q3.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Title File/Link Type Private
100% Waiver Request Approval of SP&R Waiver Pooled Fund Solicitation #1444.pdf Memorandum Public

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