Development of an Improved Design Procedure for Unbonded Concrete Overlays

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General Information
Study Number: TPF-5(269)
Lead Organization: Minnesota Department of Transportation
Contract Start Date: Jun 17, 2013
Solicitation Number: 1309
Partners: GADOT, IADOT, KS, MI, MN, MO, NC, OK
Contractor(s): University of Minnesota
Status: Objectives fulfilled
Est. Completion Date: Apr 30, 2019
Contract/Other Number: University of Pittsburgh
Last Updated: Aug 26, 2020
Contract End Date: Jun 30, 2019
Financial Summary
Contract Amount: $463,787.00
Total Commitments Received: $460,000.00
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Tom Burnham
Tom.Burnham@state.mn.us
Phone: 651-366-5452
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Gina Ahlstrom
Gina.Ahlstrom@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 202-366-4612
Study Champion(s): Tom Burnham
Tom.Burnham@state.mn.us
Phone: 651-366-5452
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Georgia Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Jason Waters Supriya Kamatkar 404-347-0552 skamatkar@dot.ga.gov
Georgia Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Jason Waters Supriya Kamatkar 404-347-0552 skamatkar@dot.ga.gov
Georgia Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Jason Waters Supriya Kamatkar 404-347-0552 skamatkar@dot.ga.gov
Iowa Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Chris Brakke Cheryl Cowie 515-239-1447 Cheryl.Cowie@iowadot.us
Iowa Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Chris Brakke Cheryl Cowie 515-239-1447 Cheryl.Cowie@iowadot.us
Iowa Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Chris Brakke Cheryl Cowie 515-239-1447 Cheryl.Cowie@iowadot.us
Kansas Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Andrew Gisi David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Andrew Gisi David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Andrew Gisi David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Michigan Department of Transportation 2012 $0.00 Benjamin Krom Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Michigan Department of Transportation 2013 $40,000.00 Benjamin Krom Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Michigan Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Benjamin Krom Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Missouri Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 John Donahue Bill Stone 573-526-4328 william.stone@modot.mo.gov
Missouri Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 John Donahue Bill Stone 573-526-4328 william.stone@modot.mo.gov
Missouri Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 John Donahue Bill Stone 573-526-4328 william.stone@modot.mo.gov
Missouri Department of Transportation 2015 $0.00 John Donahue Bill Stone 573-526-4328 william.stone@modot.mo.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Nilesh Surti Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Nilesh Surti Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
Oklahoma Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Josh Randell Ron Curb (405)420-9163 rcurb@odot.org
Oklahoma Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Josh Randell Ron Curb (405)420-9163 rcurb@odot.org
Oklahoma Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Josh Randell Ron Curb (405)420-9163 rcurb@odot.org

Study Description

One pavement rehabilitation option that has been gaining popularity in the U.S. recently is unbonded concrete overlays of existing concrete or composite pavements (UCOCP). While thicker (greater than 7 inches) unbonded concrete overlays have performed very well in many states, current economic restrictions, as well as an interest in using less materials (sustainability), are guiding agencies toward optimizing concrete overlays. This can be done by making the best use of the existing pavement structure and designing a cost effective interlayer and concrete overlay. One area of deficiency in the application of unbonded concrete overlays is the lack of a rational design procedure that addresses all components of the structure and their interaction. While several design procedures have been formulated by local agencies and the concrete paving industry, few are based on detailed research and actual long term field performance. The increasing number of UCOCP projects, as well as test tracks like the Minnesota Road Research (MnROAD) facility, are beginning to provide detailed performance data that can be used to develop a much improved and unified mechanistic-empirical based design procedure for unbonded concrete overlays. Overall guidance on the economics and design of such features as pavement widening, super elevations, and safety features (raising guardrails) are covered in publications like the National Concrete Pavement Technology Center’s (NCPTC) “Guide to Concrete Overlays” (Harrington,et al. 2008). Detailed guidance on using existing unbonded concrete overlay design procedures will soon be provided by the NCPTC publication “Design of Concrete Overlays Using Existing Methodologies” (Fall 2011). A review of the existing design procedures included in that document show some areas in need of improvement and expansion. The 1993 AASHTO Pavement Design Guide is based on performance equations developed from 2 years of testing on the AASHO Road test in the late 1950’s. No overlay sections were included in those experiments. Guidance is supplied principally on successful empirical experience and good general pavement design practices. Certainly the effects of various types of interlayers on long term performance are not considered in the design procedure. The use of the Remaining Life method in assessing the existing structural capacity of the pavement before overlay is acknowledged in the AASHTO guide as being deficient. This method typically leads to conservative (thick) designs, and does not take into account the recommended practice of using smaller panel sizes as slab thickness decreases. The MEPDG (Mechanistic Empirical Pavement Design Guide) is an improvement over the 1993 AASHTO design method, but has limitations as well when designing unbonded concrete overlays. While it can accommodate designs with smaller panel sizes, the minimum overlay thickness is 7 inches. Similar to the AASHTO method, the MEPDG does not consider friction or bond between the overlay and the interlayer. This again can lead to conservative designs. Characterization of the behavior and performance of the interlayer is critical in the design of unbonded concrete overlays. Many different materials have been used for the separation layer. The most common practice is to use an asphalt based material. This material is placed prior to the concrete overlay on existing concrete pavements, or for composite pavements (asphalt overlay on old concrete) the existing asphalt is often milled to a minimum specified depth. Questions arise over whether the separator layer needs to be drainable, or what condition an old asphalt layer must be in to provide the long term functions of a separator layer. Several states, including Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, and Minnesota have recently used non-woven geotextiles for the separation layer. This is an adaptation of the practice in Germany of using geotextile...

Objectives

The primary purpose of this project is to create a unified national design guide for unbonded concrete overlays of existing concrete and composite pavements. This consists of the following distinct objectives:

1. Study and understand the field performance history of UCOCP as demonstrated by various test sections and in-service pavements.

2. Determine suitable separator layer (interlayer) materials and properties to insure long term performance of UCOCP systems.

3. Develop a design procedure for unbonded concrete overlays of existing concrete and composite pavements utilizing existing validated performance models, as well as new analytical models derived to address deficient or missing design parameters in existing methods. The design guide will be based on mechanistic-empirical principles, including the effects of various concrete overlay materials, separator layer (interlayer) types, panel thickness (4” to 10”?) and panel size, joint load transfer mechanisms, traffic loads, and climates (nation-wide) in which they must perform.

Scope of Work

This research project would be carried out in 5 tasks:

1. Literature review and summary of existing UCOCP design procedures, and survey of performance of experimental and in-service UCOCP projects.

2. Develop separator layer (interlayer) design parameters and performance model(s) for various materials based on field testing results and limited laboratory testing (if needed).

3. Develop new, or improve existing UCOCP pavement response and performance prediction models that incorporate slab thickness (4” to 10”?) and panel size, joint load transfer mechanisms, axle load configuration, condition of the existing pavement, climate (nation-wide), and performance of a separator layer over time. Existing national climate models should be adopted and updated as needed.

4. Develop a unified national mechanistic-empirical design procedure for unbonded concrete overlays of existing concrete and composite pavements. The design procedure should consist of a self-contained spreadsheet or software program, but should be formulated to easily be adopted into DARWIN ME in the future. The procedure must accommodate a variety of climate conditions, axle load configurations, underlying pavement conditions, and time dependent performance of the separator layer.

5. Create a user’s guide on how to use the new procedure.

Comments

This study will provide a unified national design procedure that can be incorporated into local or national design guides for highway pavements. States and Agencies will achieve improved performance and lower life cycle costs from unbonded concrete overlays. This study will address many of the deficiencies in existing design procedures, particularly those associated with the selection of interlayers.

Participating states to commit $20,000 each year for 3 years.

Subjects: Pavement Design, Management, and Performance

Documents Attached
Title File/Link Type Privacy Download
Development of an Improved Design Procedure for Unbonded Concrete Overlays - Final report 202008.pdf Final Report Public
Acceptance Memo Acceptance Memo_TPF-5(269).pdf Memorandum Public
TPF 5-269 TAP meeting minutes 12-16-13 TPF 5-269 2nd TAP meeting minutes 12-16-13.docx Memorandum Public
Task 1 memo TPF5269_UBOL_Task_1_Memo.pdf Memorandum Public
June 24 2015 TAP meeting minutes TPF 5-269 4th TAP meeting minutes 6-24-15.docx Memorandum Public
Feb 22 2016 TAP meeting minutes Minutes for TPF 5-269 TAP meeting on 2-22-16.docx Memorandum Public
Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting minutes TPF 5(269) Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting minutes.docx Memorandum Public
Mar 19 2018 TAP meeting minutes TPF 5(269) Mar 19 2018 TAP meeting minutes.pdf Memorandum Public
TPF 5(269) Sep 24 2019 Final TAP meeting minutes.pdf TPF 5(269) Sep 24 2019 TAP meeting minutes.pdf Memorandum Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2012 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October-December 2012.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January-March 2013 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January-March 2013.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for April-June 2013 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April-June 2013.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Quarterly Report for July-September 2013 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July-September2013.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quaterly Report for October -December 2013 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October-December2013.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report for January - March 2014 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January-March 2014.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report for April-June 2014 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April-June 2014.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report for July-September 2014 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July-September 2014.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report for October-December 2014 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October-December2014.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quaterly report for January-MArch 2015 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January-March 2015.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quaterly report for April-June 2015 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2015.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2015 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July - September 2015.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2015 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October - December 2015.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January-March 2016 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January - March 2016.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarter report for April -June 2016 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2016.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2016 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July - September 2016.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2016 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October - December 2016.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January-March 2017 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January - March 2017.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarter report for April -June 2017 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2017.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2017 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July - September 2017.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2017 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October - December 2017.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January - March 2018 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January - March 2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for April - June 2018 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2018 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July - September 2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2018 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October - December 2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January - March 2019 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January - March 2019.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for April - June 2019 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2019.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2019 TPF 5-165 Quarterly Report - July-September 2019.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2019 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October-December 2019.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January - March 2020 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January-March 2020.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for April - June 2020 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2020.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Task 2 Report: Interlayer Characterization, Field Performance Assessment, and Guidelines on Drainage UBOL_Task_2_Report_Final.pdf Report Public
U of Mn Task 3 Report: Structural Model Development UBOL_T3_Report_FINAL.pdf Report Public
Task 4 - Report Develop Mechanistic-Empirical Design Procedure - Partial Report TPF-5(269)-Task4-041217 - TB comments addressed.docx Report Public
U of Pitt Task 3 Report: Guidelines for Selection of a Suitable Interlayer for an Unbonded Concrete Overlay Final Task 3 report 10-1-2019.docx Report Public
Dec 16 2013 TAP Meeting Presentation Slides Tap1_LK.pptx Study Summary Public
Feb 22 2016 TAP meeting presentation slides Lev K 2016.02.22.UBOLTask3 - Lev.pdf Study Summary Public
Feb 22 2016 TAP meeting prensentation slides Julie V UBOL TAP Meeting 022216 - Julie.pdf Study Summary Public
Feb 22 2016 TAP meeting prensentation slides Mark S UBOL Drainage Guidelines- Snyder.pptx Study Summary Public
Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting presentation slides Task 4 - Lev K 2016.12.20.UBOL.Task4.pdf Study Summary Public
Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting presentation slides Julie V UBOL TAP Meeting 122016 PIT jmv 122016.pdf Study Summary Public
Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting presentation slides project summary - Lev K 2016.12.20.pdf Study Summary Public
Mar 19 2018 TAP meeting presentation slides Lev K TAP Meeting Presentation 031918.pdf Study Summary Public
Sept 24 2019 Final TAP meeting Introduction slides - Tom B TPF 5(269) Project Review - Burnham 9-24-19.pptx Study Summary Public

No document attached.

Development of an Improved Design Procedure for Unbonded Concrete Overlays

General Information
Study Number: TPF-5(269)
Lead Organization: Minnesota Department of Transportation
Contract Start Date: Jun 17, 2013
Solicitation Number: 1309
Partners: GADOT, IADOT, KS, MI, MN, MO, NC, OK
Contractor(s): University of Minnesota
Status: Objectives fulfilled
Est. Completion Date: Apr 30, 2019
Contract/Other Number: University of Pittsburgh
Last Updated: Aug 26, 2020
Contract End Date: Jun 30, 2019
Financial Summary
Contract Amount: $463,787.00
Total Commitments Received: $460,000.00
100% SP&R Approval:
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Tom Burnham
Tom.Burnham@state.mn.us
Phone: 651-366-5452
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Gina Ahlstrom
Gina.Ahlstrom@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 202-366-4612
Commitments by Organizations
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Georgia Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Jason Waters Supriya Kamatkar 404-347-0552 skamatkar@dot.ga.gov
Georgia Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Jason Waters Supriya Kamatkar 404-347-0552 skamatkar@dot.ga.gov
Georgia Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Jason Waters Supriya Kamatkar 404-347-0552 skamatkar@dot.ga.gov
Iowa Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Chris Brakke Cheryl Cowie 515-239-1447 Cheryl.Cowie@iowadot.us
Iowa Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Chris Brakke Cheryl Cowie 515-239-1447 Cheryl.Cowie@iowadot.us
Iowa Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Chris Brakke Cheryl Cowie 515-239-1447 Cheryl.Cowie@iowadot.us
Kansas Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Andrew Gisi David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Andrew Gisi David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Andrew Gisi David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Michigan Department of Transportation 2012 $0.00 Benjamin Krom Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Michigan Department of Transportation 2013 $40,000.00 Benjamin Krom Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Michigan Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Benjamin Krom Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Missouri Department of Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 John Donahue Bill Stone 573-526-4328 william.stone@modot.mo.gov
Missouri Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 John Donahue Bill Stone 573-526-4328 william.stone@modot.mo.gov
Missouri Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 John Donahue Bill Stone 573-526-4328 william.stone@modot.mo.gov
Missouri Department of Transportation 2015 $0.00 John Donahue Bill Stone 573-526-4328 william.stone@modot.mo.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Nilesh Surti Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Nilesh Surti Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
Oklahoma Transportation 2012 $20,000.00 Josh Randell Ron Curb (405)420-9163 rcurb@odot.org
Oklahoma Transportation 2013 $20,000.00 Josh Randell Ron Curb (405)420-9163 rcurb@odot.org
Oklahoma Transportation 2014 $20,000.00 Josh Randell Ron Curb (405)420-9163 rcurb@odot.org

Study Description

Study Description

One pavement rehabilitation option that has been gaining popularity in the U.S. recently is unbonded concrete overlays of existing concrete or composite pavements (UCOCP). While thicker (greater than 7 inches) unbonded concrete overlays have performed very well in many states, current economic restrictions, as well as an interest in using less materials (sustainability), are guiding agencies toward optimizing concrete overlays. This can be done by making the best use of the existing pavement structure and designing a cost effective interlayer and concrete overlay. One area of deficiency in the application of unbonded concrete overlays is the lack of a rational design procedure that addresses all components of the structure and their interaction. While several design procedures have been formulated by local agencies and the concrete paving industry, few are based on detailed research and actual long term field performance. The increasing number of UCOCP projects, as well as test tracks like the Minnesota Road Research (MnROAD) facility, are beginning to provide detailed performance data that can be used to develop a much improved and unified mechanistic-empirical based design procedure for unbonded concrete overlays. Overall guidance on the economics and design of such features as pavement widening, super elevations, and safety features (raising guardrails) are covered in publications like the National Concrete Pavement Technology Center’s (NCPTC) “Guide to Concrete Overlays” (Harrington,et al. 2008). Detailed guidance on using existing unbonded concrete overlay design procedures will soon be provided by the NCPTC publication “Design of Concrete Overlays Using Existing Methodologies” (Fall 2011). A review of the existing design procedures included in that document show some areas in need of improvement and expansion. The 1993 AASHTO Pavement Design Guide is based on performance equations developed from 2 years of testing on the AASHO Road test in the late 1950’s. No overlay sections were included in those experiments. Guidance is supplied principally on successful empirical experience and good general pavement design practices. Certainly the effects of various types of interlayers on long term performance are not considered in the design procedure. The use of the Remaining Life method in assessing the existing structural capacity of the pavement before overlay is acknowledged in the AASHTO guide as being deficient. This method typically leads to conservative (thick) designs, and does not take into account the recommended practice of using smaller panel sizes as slab thickness decreases. The MEPDG (Mechanistic Empirical Pavement Design Guide) is an improvement over the 1993 AASHTO design method, but has limitations as well when designing unbonded concrete overlays. While it can accommodate designs with smaller panel sizes, the minimum overlay thickness is 7 inches. Similar to the AASHTO method, the MEPDG does not consider friction or bond between the overlay and the interlayer. This again can lead to conservative designs. Characterization of the behavior and performance of the interlayer is critical in the design of unbonded concrete overlays. Many different materials have been used for the separation layer. The most common practice is to use an asphalt based material. This material is placed prior to the concrete overlay on existing concrete pavements, or for composite pavements (asphalt overlay on old concrete) the existing asphalt is often milled to a minimum specified depth. Questions arise over whether the separator layer needs to be drainable, or what condition an old asphalt layer must be in to provide the long term functions of a separator layer. Several states, including Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, and Minnesota have recently used non-woven geotextiles for the separation layer. This is an adaptation of the practice in Germany of using geotextile...

Objectives

The primary purpose of this project is to create a unified national design guide for unbonded concrete overlays of existing concrete and composite pavements. This consists of the following distinct objectives:

1. Study and understand the field performance history of UCOCP as demonstrated by various test sections and in-service pavements.

2. Determine suitable separator layer (interlayer) materials and properties to insure long term performance of UCOCP systems.

3. Develop a design procedure for unbonded concrete overlays of existing concrete and composite pavements utilizing existing validated performance models, as well as new analytical models derived to address deficient or missing design parameters in existing methods. The design guide will be based on mechanistic-empirical principles, including the effects of various concrete overlay materials, separator layer (interlayer) types, panel thickness (4” to 10”?) and panel size, joint load transfer mechanisms, traffic loads, and climates (nation-wide) in which they must perform.

Scope of Work

This research project would be carried out in 5 tasks:

1. Literature review and summary of existing UCOCP design procedures, and survey of performance of experimental and in-service UCOCP projects.

2. Develop separator layer (interlayer) design parameters and performance model(s) for various materials based on field testing results and limited laboratory testing (if needed).

3. Develop new, or improve existing UCOCP pavement response and performance prediction models that incorporate slab thickness (4” to 10”?) and panel size, joint load transfer mechanisms, axle load configuration, condition of the existing pavement, climate (nation-wide), and performance of a separator layer over time. Existing national climate models should be adopted and updated as needed.

4. Develop a unified national mechanistic-empirical design procedure for unbonded concrete overlays of existing concrete and composite pavements. The design procedure should consist of a self-contained spreadsheet or software program, but should be formulated to easily be adopted into DARWIN ME in the future. The procedure must accommodate a variety of climate conditions, axle load configurations, underlying pavement conditions, and time dependent performance of the separator layer.

5. Create a user’s guide on how to use the new procedure.

Comments

This study will provide a unified national design procedure that can be incorporated into local or national design guides for highway pavements. States and Agencies will achieve improved performance and lower life cycle costs from unbonded concrete overlays. This study will address many of the deficiencies in existing design procedures, particularly those associated with the selection of interlayers.

Participating states to commit $20,000 each year for 3 years.

Subjects: Pavement Design, Management, and Performance

Title File/Link Type Private
Development of an Improved Design Procedure for Unbonded Concrete Overlays - Final report 202008.pdf Final Report Public
Acceptance Memo Acceptance Memo_TPF-5(269).pdf Memorandum Public
TPF 5-269 TAP meeting minutes 12-16-13 TPF 5-269 2nd TAP meeting minutes 12-16-13.docx Memorandum Public
Task 1 memo TPF5269_UBOL_Task_1_Memo.pdf Memorandum Public
June 24 2015 TAP meeting minutes TPF 5-269 4th TAP meeting minutes 6-24-15.docx Memorandum Public
Feb 22 2016 TAP meeting minutes Minutes for TPF 5-269 TAP meeting on 2-22-16.docx Memorandum Public
Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting minutes TPF 5(269) Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting minutes.docx Memorandum Public
Mar 19 2018 TAP meeting minutes TPF 5(269) Mar 19 2018 TAP meeting minutes.pdf Memorandum Public
TPF 5(269) Sep 24 2019 Final TAP meeting minutes.pdf TPF 5(269) Sep 24 2019 TAP meeting minutes.pdf Memorandum Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2012 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October-December 2012.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January-March 2013 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January-March 2013.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for April-June 2013 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April-June 2013.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Quarterly Report for July-September 2013 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July-September2013.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quaterly Report for October -December 2013 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October-December2013.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report for January - March 2014 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January-March 2014.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report for April-June 2014 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April-June 2014.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report for July-September 2014 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July-September 2014.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report for October-December 2014 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October-December2014.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quaterly report for January-MArch 2015 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January-March 2015.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quaterly report for April-June 2015 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2015.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2015 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July - September 2015.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2015 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October - December 2015.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January-March 2016 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January - March 2016.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarter report for April -June 2016 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2016.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2016 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July - September 2016.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2016 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October - December 2016.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January-March 2017 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January - March 2017.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarter report for April -June 2017 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2017.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2017 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July - September 2017.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2017 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October - December 2017.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January - March 2018 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January - March 2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for April - June 2018 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2018 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - July - September 2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2018 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October - December 2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January - March 2019 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January - March 2019.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for April - June 2019 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2019.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for July-September 2019 TPF 5-165 Quarterly Report - July-September 2019.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for October-December 2019 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - October-December 2019.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for January - March 2020 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - January-March 2020.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF 5-269 Quarterly report for April - June 2020 TPF 5-269 Quarterly Report - April - June 2020.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
Task 2 Report: Interlayer Characterization, Field Performance Assessment, and Guidelines on Drainage UBOL_Task_2_Report_Final.pdf Report Public
U of Mn Task 3 Report: Structural Model Development UBOL_T3_Report_FINAL.pdf Report Public
Task 4 - Report Develop Mechanistic-Empirical Design Procedure - Partial Report TPF-5(269)-Task4-041217 - TB comments addressed.docx Report Public
U of Pitt Task 3 Report: Guidelines for Selection of a Suitable Interlayer for an Unbonded Concrete Overlay Final Task 3 report 10-1-2019.docx Report Public
Dec 16 2013 TAP Meeting Presentation Slides Tap1_LK.pptx Study Summary Public
Feb 22 2016 TAP meeting presentation slides Lev K 2016.02.22.UBOLTask3 - Lev.pdf Study Summary Public
Feb 22 2016 TAP meeting prensentation slides Julie V UBOL TAP Meeting 022216 - Julie.pdf Study Summary Public
Feb 22 2016 TAP meeting prensentation slides Mark S UBOL Drainage Guidelines- Snyder.pptx Study Summary Public
Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting presentation slides Task 4 - Lev K 2016.12.20.UBOL.Task4.pdf Study Summary Public
Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting presentation slides Julie V UBOL TAP Meeting 122016 PIT jmv 122016.pdf Study Summary Public
Dec 20 2016 TAP meeting presentation slides project summary - Lev K 2016.12.20.pdf Study Summary Public
Mar 19 2018 TAP meeting presentation slides Lev K TAP Meeting Presentation 031918.pdf Study Summary Public
Sept 24 2019 Final TAP meeting Introduction slides - Tom B TPF 5(269) Project Review - Burnham 9-24-19.pptx Study Summary Public
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